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THE EDIT

TEN THINGS TO DO IN FEBRUARY

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BETTY WOODMAN: THEATRE OF THE DOMESTIC


American artist Betty Woodman is one of the most important contemporary ceramics artists. Woodnman was born in 1930, and this is her first UK solo exhibition. Theatre of the Domestic explores her recent work and her mixed-media pieces and highlights the boldness and experimentation that the artist has become known for.

Until 10 April, Institute of Contemporary Arts, The Mall, London SW1Y 5AH



LONDON FASHION WEEK


Bringing together both home-grown talents and some of the biggest names in fashion from all over the globe, we’ve got our eyes on British design Gareth Pugh, and young talent, Molly Goddard. Organised by the British Fashion Council, this is one of the biggest dates in London’s calendar.


19–23 February, Brewer Street Car Park, Soho W1F 0LA, and various locations



IMAGINE CHILDREN’S FESTIVAL

Kids are taking over Southbank Centre for two weeks of festivities. Inspired by the iconic works of Roald Dahl, and expressed through immersive theatre, dance, music, and comedy shows, there are also film screenings of classic adaptations, and readings from some of our best-known authors. Anyone looking forward to the release of the BFG film won’t want to miss this.


10–21 February, Southbank Centre 

Belvedere Rd, London SE1 8XX



CHINESE NEW YEAR

Celebrate the Year of the Monkey at the free festivities in Trafalgar Square, Chinatown and Shaftesbury Avenue. There’s a parade and a main stage event 10am– 6pm on 14 February in Trafalgar Square.


Europa House recommends Pearl Liang in Paddington, or if you’re at the Laslett in Nothing Hill, go for lobster noodles at the Mandarin Kitchen in Queensway. Head over to the UK’s first Chinese lantern festival, taking place at Chiswick House Gardens.

 


PERFORMING FOR THE CAMERA


This exhibition at the Tate asks ‘what does it mean to perform to the camera?’ and displays over 500 images from 50 seminal photographers. Exploring how groundbreaking photographs have captured performances  and dance, and how the camera has pointed its lens at society. There’s work by Cindy Sherman looking at gender and identity, and it looks at images used for marketing and self-promotion as well as Instagram photography.



18 February to 12 June, Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG


PINK MIST

 

Poet Owen Sheer’s play is inspired by interviews from returning soldiers. Following best friends Arthur, Hads and Taff who have returned home after stints in Afghanistan, and how they are burdened with the mental scars of war. The play examines what might be a greater battle for them – being back home – and how they try to get back to their lives while physical and psychological aftershocks take a toll on the people in their life.


Until 13 February

Bush Theatre, 7 Uxbridge Road, London W12 8LJ



PEOPLE, PLACES AND THINGS

 

‘Emma was having the time of her life. Now she’s in rehab.’ This darkly humorous play is the result of the latest collaboration between Headlong and the National Theatre. Thirty-something Emma is an actress who checks herself into rehab after a downward spiral. Rationalising her problems and asking in a society more driven by its compulsions than convictions, how can an addict expect to recover and survive in the modern world?

15 March to 4 June

Wyndhams Theatre, Charing Cross Rd, London WC2H 0DA



CREATION FROM CATASTROPHE: HOW ARCHITECTURE REBUILDS COMMUNITIES


When disasters hit whether man-made or natural, it devastates homes, business and the very infrastructure of a city or community. Creation from Catastrophe ponders the light at the end of the tunnel that appears after these events through a series of case studies. This exhibtion showcases how architecture can, and has rebuilt communities, and it looks at how cities have been re-imagined and rebuilt in the wake of a disaster. Staying close to home with five alternative plans created for London after the Great Fire of 1666, this exhibition takes you on a journey through some of the most well-documented global disasters from the last five centuries.


Until 24 April

RIBA, 66 Portland Place, London W1B 1AD


NEW OPENING – FRENCHIE

Gregory Marchand brings his hugely popular ‘Frenchie’ concept to London’s Covent Garden. Taking the lead from it’s Parisian Counterpart, the menu will include favourites such as ‘Duck Foie Gras Pressé with Smoked Eel, and dishes inspired by Marchand’s time in Asia such as ricotta tortelli with Lapsang Souchong and lemon caviar. Whilist worldly in menu, all the ingredients will be British sourced, which ticks all our boxes!

 

RE-OPENING - ASSAGGI

 

We’ve really missed this fantastic local eatery in Notting Hill. Luckily after having been closed for refurbishments Assaggi is no back open, serving it’s brand of un-fussy, and delicious Italian food. Better yet, they are set to expand within their pub site in Westbourne Grove, and we look forward to trying the brand new breakfast menu – buon appetitio!





Image credit L-R:

Performing for the Camera - Masahisa Fukase, From Window 1974 (c) Masahisa Fukase, 

Detail of Wallpaper #9, Betty Woodman, 2015,

Shaung Shaung, People Places Things, The NAtional Theatre,